In Social Studies, kindergarteners begin learning about themselves and move outward.  They develop an understanding of self, one's relationship with others, and one's relationship to the environment.  The curriculum is designed to introduce students to concepts related to map skills, past and present, and citizenship.  

 

UNITS AND INDICATORS

I.  Rules and Responsibilities

  • Identify reasons for classroom and school rules, such as maintaining order and keeping the community safe.
  • Recognize rules help promote fairness, responsible behavior, and privacy.
  • Identify, discuss, and demonstrate appropriate social skills, such as listening to the speaker, taking turns, settling disagreements, and reaching compromise at home and in school.
  • Identify and describe rights and responsibilities in the classroom and family.
  • Describe the role of members of school such as principal, crossing guide, bus drivers and teachers.
  • Identify and describe rights and responsibilities in the classroom and family.
  • Identify common symbols such as the American Flag and Statue of Liberty.
  • Recognize that saying the Pledge of Allegiance and singing, “The Star Spangled Banner” are practices associated with being a citizen.
  • Identify the contributions of people, past and present, such as George Washington, Rosa parks and the current President.
  • Use informational text to identify and discuss the contributions of individuals recognized on national holidays, such as Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and Presidents’ Day.

II.  Me and My Family

  • Identify ways that people travel on land, water, and air.
  • Explain how transportation is used to move goods and people from place to place.
  • Identify ways that people communicate messages.
  • Identify ways people adapt to the environment, such as wear clothing that is appropriate to the weather.
  • Identify and describe events of the day in chronological order.
  • Describe daily events in terms of yesterday today, and tomorrow.
  • Compare tools and toys of the past with those of today.
  • Tell about people in the past using informational text and features.
  • Identify ways people adapt to the environment, such as wearing clothing that is appropriate to the weather.
  • Identify ways that people change their environment to meet their needs, such as planting crops or cutting forest.
  • Give examples of qualities, such as customs, interest, skills, and experiences that make individuals and families in their immediate environment unique.
  • Begin to be aware of technology and how it affects life.

III.  Me on the Map

  • Describe a globe as a model of Earth showing land and water.
  • Explain how transportation is used to move goods and people from place to place,
  • Identify ways that people communicate messages.
  • Identify ways people adapt to the environment, such as wearing clothing that is appropriate to the weather.
  • Identify and describe events of the day in chronological order.
  • Describe daily events in terms of yesterday, today, and tomorrow.
  • Compare tools and toys of the past with those of today.
  • Tell about people in the past using informational text and features.
  • Identify ways that people change their environment to meet their needs, such as planting crops or cutting forest.
  • Give examples of qualities such as customs, interests, skills and experiences that make individuals and families in their immediate environment unique.
  • Begin to be aware of technology and how it affects life.