​In Social Studies, second graders explore the world around them with an emphasis on commerce, technology, culture, responsible citizenship, and geography.  Students are actively engaged in the learning process, conducting research, using geographic tools, and making real world connections to the content.

UNITS AND INDICATORS

I.  Our Community at Work

  • Identify the natural, capital, and human resources used in the production of a good or service.
  • Identify goods and services provided by businesses.
  • Emergence, Expansion and Changes in nations and Empires.
  • Identify examples of technology used by consumers, such as automobiles, cameras, telephones, microwaves, televisions, and computers.
  • Analyze why consumers use technology in their daily lives.
  • Compare types of transportation used to move goods and people today and long ago.
  • Compare ways people communicate ideas today and long ago.
  • Describe difference market situations where buyers and sellers meet to exchange goods and services.
  • Identify goods and services provided by businesses.
  • Identify and explain economic choices people make.
  • Identify and give examples of positive and negative aspects of each choice.
  • Explain that choices have consequences, some of which are more important than others.
  • Describe different market situations were buyers and sellers meet to exchange goods and services.
  • Describe how people meet in market communities around the world, such as farmers’ markets and door-to-door sales.
  • Explain different ways to pay for goods and services, such as credit cards, checks, debit cards, and money orders.
  • Identify examples of specialized workers in the school and community, such as nurses, truck drivers, lawyers, and postal workers.
  • Identify goods and services provided by government.
  • Identify examples of specialized workers in the school and community.

II.  Responsible Citizens

  • Explain how school and community rules promote orderliness, fairness, responsibility, privacy and safety.
  • Use appropriate informational text to develop an understanding of democratic skills and attitudes, such as rights and responsibilities, respect, fairness, honesty, loyalty, and courage.
  • Identify ways people adapt to the environment, such as wearing clothing that is appropriate to the weather.
  • Identify leadership positions and organizations in the community and explain how they can be helpful in maintain safety and order.
  • Connect certain people, symbols, songs and poems to the ideals they represent, such as George Washington portrays leadership, the American Flag represents loyalty and respect, and the Star Spangled Banner represents courage and freedom.
  • Describe the contributions of local government leaders and current leaders of their school and community, such as county executives, county council or mayor and city council.
  • Explain how contributions of people recognized in holidays, such as Memorial Day and Constitution Day; represent democratic beliefs and attitudes, that include rights and responsibilities, loyalty, respect, and courage.
  • Recognize and describe how making choices affects self, family, school, and community.
  • Gather and interpret information about the past from informational sources and biographies.
  • Conflict between Ideas and Institutions.

III.  The World and Me

  • Identify and use map elements, such as title, compass rose, simple grid systems, lend and key, date, and author to interpret a map.
  • Identify the purpose and use of a globe and a variety of maps and atlases, such as school maps, neighborhood maps and simple atlases.
  • Identify and use map elements, such as title, compass rose, simple grid system, legend and key, date, and author to interpret a map.
  • Describe place using bird’s eye view, and satellite images, photographs, and pictures.
  • Identify the equator, poles, seven continents, four oceans and countries on a map and globe.
  • Identify natural/physical features and human-made features using maps and photographs.
  • Describe and classify regions using climate, vegetation, animal life, and natural/physical features.
  • Describe how geographic characteristics determine choices, such as climate guides decision about food, clothing, and shelter.
  • Describe ways, such as clearing trees and farming land, that people modify their environment and the impact of those modifications.
  • Describe how and why people protect or fail to protect the environment.
  • Explain how people adapt to changes in the environment.
  • Identify concerns in the community, such as safety issues and pollution problems and ways to resolve these concerns.
  • Classify places as rural and urban.
  • Gather and interpret information about the past from informational sources and biographies.
  • Develop a personal timeline in each students’ life.
  • Describe the relationship among events in a variety of timelines.
  • Use fiction and non-fiction to compare the elements of two different cultures, and how they meet their human needs for food, shelter, and other commonalities such as recreation, music, and stories.
  • Explain ways people of different ages and/or cultural backgrounds can respect and help to pass on traditions and customs.
  • Give examples of how families in the community share and borrow customs and traditions from other cultures.
  • Identify and demonstrate appropriate social skills necessary for working in a cooperative group, such as sharing concern, care, and respect among group members.
  • Analyze how different points of view in school situations may result in compromise or conflict.
  • Collect and examine photographs of the past and compare with similar, current images, such as, photographs of modes of transportation and communication.  

HELPFUL PARENT TIPS

  • Draw maps of a room, your yard, and your neighborhood with your child.  Use direction words to discuss your maps.
  • Take your child with you to vote and explain how you make your choices.
  • Have a job your child is responsible for each day.
  • Talk about what school was like when you were young and when grandparents were young.
  • Take day trips to the Zoo, Gettysburg, Washington, D.C., Maryland Science Center, Walter's Art Gallery, B&O Railroad Museum, Baltimore Aquarium, and Baltimore Museum of Art.  Use floor plans and maps during your trips.
  • Write in your journal after a trip and do follow-up reading/research as a family.
  • Talk about your work and why it is important.  Take your child to visit, if appropriate.