Third Grade Mathematics
Unit 3
Equal Partitioning and Naming Fractions

Printable Parent Letter

During Unit 3, your children will develop an understanding of fractions, beginning with unit fractions. They will view fractions as being built out of unit fractions, and use fractions along with visual fraction models to represent parts of a whole.  Your children will understand a fraction as a number on a number line and represent fractions on a number line.
 

Students need to:

  • Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.
  • Partition shapes into parts with equal area.  Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole.  For example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as ¼ of the area of the shape.
  • Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram.
  • Represent a fraction 1/b  on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts.  Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line.
  • Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from 0.  Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.

Carroll County Public Schools Video Support


Introduction to Unit Fractions

Ways Parents Can Help

  • Involve your child in cooking activities. Have them select the appropriate measuring spoons and cups for the recipe. If ingredients need to be doubled or halved, ask them to figure out what the new quantity would be for the recipe.
  • When food items need to be cut or shared equally by your family or a group of people, have your child consider how many parts there will be and what fractional part each person will get.
  • Divide a large pile of objects (cereal, plastic animals, blocks, etc.) equally into 4 piles to illustrate one-fourth. Recombine the group to divide into other fractions.
  • Fold a piece of paper into halves, and then into halves again with your child. Open it up to show the division of fourths. Fold the paper again into fourths then make another fold to show eighths.
  • Count the rooms in your house and make up some fraction facts about them. One-half of the rooms have windows; one-third of them have pillows; etc.
  • While in the car, mark the passing of time with fractions. "We are one-third of the way there." "It will take us 20 minutes to get to the library." "In how many minutes will we be half-way there?"

Some Support Sites

 

 

Key Vocabulary to Know

Fraction: A number that represents one or more equal parts of a whole

Unit fraction: A fraction in which its numerator is 1 and its denominator is a whole number

Numerator: The number of parts one selects from the whole

Denominator: The number of parts the "whole" is partitioned into

Halves: either of two equal parts into which a whole can be partitioned

Fourths: one or more of four equal parts into which a whole can be partitioned

Sixths: one or more of six equal parts into which a whole can be partitioned

Eighths: one or more of eight equal parts into which a whole can be partitioned

Tenths: one or more of ten equal parts into which a whole can be partitioned

Thirds: one or more of three equal parts into which a whole can be partitioned

Unit interval: on a number line, it is the whole that is the interval from 0 to 1, as measured by length