Denise Kresslein, a grade 6 science teacher at West Middle School, and Noah Scholl, a grade 6 science teacher at Mt Airy Middle School, have been selected as two of three Maryland finalists for the 2018 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. Their names have been forwarded to the National Science Foundation for consideration as the Maryland Awardee to be selected in the spring of 2019.

Denise Kresslein has been teaching in Carroll County since 1996.  She serves as science department coordinator at West Middle School and is a CCPS science curriculum writer for middle schools.  Kresslein has served on numerous Maryland State Department of Education committees, including Maryland Integrated Science Assessment range finding, content review, and standards setting.  According to Science Supervisor Jim Peters, “Ms. Kresslein is a creative and dynamic science teacher who is also a system leader for science education.”

Noah Scholl has been teaching in Carroll County since 2007.  He is a member of the Carroll County Public Schools Teacher Advisory Council and is a CCPS science curriculum writer for middle school science.  According to Science Supervisor Jim Peters, “Mr. Scholl is a kind, compassionate science teacher providing exceptional inquiry experiences for student learning.”

The Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST) is the highest recognition that a kindergarten through 12th grade mathematics or science teacher may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. The Awards were established by Congress in 1983. The President may recognize up to 108 exemplary teachers each year.

Awards are given to mathematics and science teachers from each state, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Department of Defense Education Activity schools, and the U.S. territories as a group (American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands).

Awardees serve as models for their colleagues, inspiration to their communities, and leaders in the improvement of mathematics and science education.

 

 

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